Brain injuries are internal, but their effects can sometimes be visible: For instance, a person may become unable to walk or talk like they used to. However, brain injury can also be silent. People in West Virginia may be surprised to learn that those with migraines may be more prone to this type of silent brain injury.

In 2009, about a tenth of men and more than 20 percent of women in the United States said they suffered from severe headaches or migraines. According to new research, older people who get migraines may have an increased chance of having what is called a silent brain injury. They may also experience silent strokes, which can cause brain injuries that stem from blood clots but produce no symptoms.

This is a concern, as strokes happen in about 800,000 and cause several deaths each year. May is actually American Stroke Month, so this month is an ideal time to consider changes in one’s lifestyle that may help to reduce the risk of stroke. This may include eating diets low in fat and exercising, as high blood pressure — which is linked to stroke — is associated with unhealthy foods.

A traumatic brain injury unfortunately sometimes happens because a person is involved in a tragic vehicle crash or is injured in an accident on someone else’s property. People who are injured in these situations might elect to seek restitution from the person deemed financially responsible for the accident. A successfully fought personal injury claim might allow him or her to get monies that offset the expenses resulting from the accident in West Virginia.

Source: Medical News Today, “Older people with migraines ‘more likely to have silent brain injury’“, , May 16, 2014