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Traumatic brain injuries can occur in West Virginia when one’s head violently hits a hard surface all of a sudden. These injuries can also take place if an object strikes an individual’s skull and enters the brain. Even though a severe traumatic brain injury has drawn a lot of attention lately because it can affect a person’s ability to function normally, even a mild brain injury can actually have drastic effects regarding a person’s life.

A traumatic brain injury can have serious consequences, including milder issues such as nausea and headaches or more severe problems, such as permanent damage to the brain. These injuries can even lead to death. People in West Virginia may be surprised to learn that a majority of traumatic brain injuries are actually moderate or mild — not severe — and they can result from falling off of a bike or being involved in a slow-speed vehicle accident.

A recent study indicated that people with mild traumatic brain injury, just like those with severe brain injuries, can suffer brain damage and achieve lower scores on thinking and memory skills tests. As part of the study, scans were performed using diffusion tensor imaging. This type of imaging detects damage in brain cells and maps connections among regions of the brain.

When people in West Virginia suffer either a mild traumatic brain injury or a severe brain injury, they typically have cognitive challenges and thus may struggle in academics or in the workplace. If an individual suffers brain damage due to being involved in a vehicle accident or another incident that another party is found to have caused, he or she may seek justice through the court system. He or she can file a personal injury claim against the person deemed responsible, pursuing monetary damages that can help the victim to cover the cost of treatment for his or her injuries.

Source: medicalnewstoday.com, “Brain damage ‘can follow even mild traumatic brain injury’“, Catharine Paddock, July 17, 2014