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Computers are an important part of society today. They are used in all types of industries and as supporting technology in essential infrastructures. However, sometimes computer manufacturers make mistakes when designing their product packages. This seems to be what happened with one computer firm which is now recalling its defective product amid fears that the defect could cause physical harm to customers in West Virginia and elsewhere.

Hewlett-Packard is voluntarily recalling 6 million AC power cords that were sold with various Compaq and HP computers. These models include various computer models that were sold during the period of time starting in Sept. 2010 and ending in June 2012. The company’s statement admits that the power cords can potentially overheat, which can cause burn and fire hazards.

The company had reportedly received 29 reports involving the overheating of the particular power cord model. This resulted in two incidents of minor burns as well as 13 claims of minor damage to personal property of customers. The company is advising that customers discontinue using the particular power cord and is offering free replacements for affected consumers.

However, for some people in West Virginia and elsewhere the company’s announcement may have come too late. It is possible there are even more unreported incidents of burns and fire which occurred resulting from the defective product. This can result in product liability lawsuits, which can force the company to pay monetary reimbursement to victims. On the other hand, victims will still need to prove that the company should be held legally liable in order to prevail in any lawsuits.

Source: ZDNet, “HP recalls 6 million laptop cords over burn concerns“, Leon Spencer, Aug. 27, 2014