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Backup cameras have been in development for years. There has been a lot of debate about having them included in vehicles as a mandatory safety feature. These systems are supposed to help prevent car accidents, but a claimed auto defect in the systems may keep that from occurring. This is something that will be determined in a federal lawsuit pending in another state that could impact similar accidents across the country, including in West Virginia.

A 3-year-old boy was run over and killed in Nov. 2013 in his own driveway. His father backed over him. The family has accused Ford of a design flaw in the back-up camera visibility system.

The system is designed to help reduce the number of back-up collisions that often occur because the driver is unable to see directly behind the vehicle. Unfortunately, the system did not allow the father to see his toddler son, who was behind the vehicle. As a result, he accidentally ran over him.

If there is a defect in the design, production or installation, an accident may be the tragic result — even if the backup camera is not yet mandated by law.  For West Virginia residents who have been harmed or lost a loved one due to an auto defect — such as a backup camera system not working appropriately, — there may be legal action that can be taken. A product liability lawsuit for wrongful death or personal injuries, as applicable, may be able to provide compensation to the injured that will help pay for medical costs, end-of-life expenses and other permissible damages. To prevail, the plaintiffs will need to prove that the manufacturers and/or others in the supply chain were negligent in a manner that caused or materially contributed to the fatal accident.

Source: The Southeast Texas Record, “Suit blames Ford’s rear-view system for toddler’s driveway death“, Andrea Dearden, Sept. 10, 2014