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The thought of suffering a spinal cord injury can be frightening for individuals in West Virginia. Unfortunately, it’s a real nightmare for many individuals who have been injured in car accidents. In fact, about 12,000 brand-new spinal cord injury cases arise each year.

More than 270,000 Americans currently live with this type of injury. Eighty percent of them are male, and they were about 42 years old on average when the injury occurred. In addition, car accidents constitute the biggest cause of spinal cord injuries, followed by falling accidents.

After a spinal cord injury happens, functional recovery usually occurs during the first few months of the injury. This recovery may continue for a year after the injury as well, with additional improvements possibly taking place after the first year of injury. However, even after experiencing functional achievements via rehabilitation therapy, most people with these injuries still suffer significant disability; this may include being unable to walk. One study showed that nearly 60 percent of individuals with injuries to their spinal cords couldn’t walk one year after suffering the injury.

Spinal cord injuries can severely restrict a person’s daily function. No technologies or innovations have been able to restore an injured person’s ability to move independent for long distances. Still, wearable robotic technologies may pave the way for more people with spinal cord injury to walk in the future. Those who have suffered their injuries as a result of vehicle accidents may choose to file claims against those who reportedly caused the accidents. If they win their cases, they may be awarded damages that can help to cover the cost of medical treatments designed to improve their quality of life in West Virginia.

Source: brainblogger.com, “Spinal Cord Injury and Wearable Robotics“, Vincent Huang, Sept. 9, 2014