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Having products such as generators and smoke detectors can come in handy. Having backup electricity or being able to use a fireplace can be invaluable during a rough winter season. However, when they are defective products, they can unexpectedly cause injury to consumers. Recent recalls of certain smoke detectors and generators may impact those in West Virginia and other states.

Over a million carbon monoxide and smoke detectors from the company Kidde have been recalled. These hard-wired devices apparently may not properly alert homeowners of high carbon monoxide levels or of the presence of a blaze once a power outage happens. The recalled detectors were manufactured between Dec. 2013 and May 2014. The company will replace the detectors for free.

In addition, American Honda recalled over 8,000 generators powered by gas because the back frame support may fail when the generators are lifted. This poses an impact hazard. Furthermore, the product owner’s manual might have duplicate or missing pages, thus preventing consumers from having important safety and operating information. Two reports have been made so far of the back frame support problems. The generators can be repaired for free.

If a consumer uses a product and is injured due to a defect in the item, he or she may feel disappointed and even angry. West Virginia consumers trust manufacturers to create products that are effective and safe. Injury victims have the right to take legal action against the manufacturers of the defective products that caused them harm, seeking financial damages that can help them to cover their related medical costs.

Source: wpri.com, “Safety officials issue reminder of smoke alarm recall“, Susan Hogan, Oct. 10, 2014