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The scary thing about today’s world is that there are so many products recalled. In many cases, most of the items recalled seem like ordinary products that would normally not pose any threat to consumers. While tree-cutting shears could cause injury when used inappropriately, they are not generally considered a dangerous household product. Unfortunately, that recently changed here in West Virginia and across the country. 

More than 275,000 pairs of lopper shears were recently recalled by Fiskars. The model number for these shears is 6954. The recall affects the shears that are 32 inches long.

Apparently, when these shears are used, the handles may break. This can result in serious injury. In fact, there have already been almost a dozen reports of injuries to the face and head, which required stitches.

These shears were sold exclusively online and in-store at Home Depot. They were sold between May and June of this year. Consumers are asked to stop using the shears immediately and request a replacement from Fiskars as soon as possible.

When products are designed or manufactured improperly, it can pose a serious risk of injury to consumers. Anyone here in West Virginia who has been injured by a dangerous household product, such as these shears, may be able to pursue restitution via a products liability claim. An investigation may be necessary to determine exactly what caused the injury so that the strongest possible case can be built against manufacturer and/or others in the consumer supply chain. In properly documented cases, it may be possible to achieve a monetary judgment for the financial damages sustained. 

Source: wcyb.com, “Potentially faulty shears recalled for injury risk“, , Oct. 8, 2014