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In most cases, when residents of West Virginia buy products, they work just as they should. However, there are times when individuals purchase products that fail to function as advertised. Sometimes, these defective household products are not harmful. Unfortunately, in some cases, such as is the case with one of the most recent recalls in the United States, defects can result in serious health issues. 

System Sensor, a company that sells smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, has recently recalled roughly 1,500 of its detectors. Apparently, some of its detectors may fail to accurately detect the presence of carbon monoxide gas. This poses a serious risk to occupants should the threat of carbon monoxide poisoning be imminent.

The COSMO-2W model and the COSMO-4W model are affected. They were manufactured in early Sept. 2014. The date codes for the affected devices are 4091 and 4092, which can be found in the lower left-hand label corner on the packaging, as well as on the back of the detector. The company is offering a free replacement and is recommending that the defective detectors be used until replacements can be successfully installed.

When a product is recalled because it is unable to perform as promised, injured victims in West Virginia may be able to seek financial compensation via product liability claims. These types of claims — if successful — can leave victims with settlements that may help pay for medical expenses and lost wages that occurred because of the faulty products. It is an unfortunate fact that there are defective household products out there, but it is possible to hold the manufacturers liable and make them pay for the harm that their defective products caused. 

Source: fourstateshomepage.com, “System Sensor Recalls Combination Carbon Monoxide and Smoke Detectors”, Feb. 18, 2015