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Laws in West Virginia surrounding product safety are supposed to protect consumers. Unfortunately, when manufacturers, distributors and retailers allow defective household products onto store shelves, consumers can suffer serious injuries as a result. One out-of-state woman is now attempting to prove liability after her pressure cooker supposedly exploded.

The incident took place in 2013 when the woman claims that she and a friend were cooking in her kitchen. They were using a pressure cooker sold under the Wolfgang Puck brand to prepare corned beef. When the light turned off alerting them that their food was finished cooking, they unplugged the pressure cooker. Per the instructions, they then released the steam using the pressure release valve.

They allowed the pressure cooker to sit for roughly 20 minutes. The woman’s friend then began to open the lid of the pressure cooker. It was at this time that the lid blew off of the cooking device, and the scalding contents exploded onto the woman. The woman has since filed a lawsuit against the companies associated with the product.

West Virginia residents who are injured due to defective household products are entitled to pursue civil claims in court in order to pursue compensation. It is up to the victims to convince the judges or juries that the manufacturers, retailers or other defendants should be held liable for the losses sustained. Negligence must be proved in order for claims to be successful. When cases are successfully litigated, monetary settlements may be awarded to the victims to help them recoup any financial losses suffered. 

Source: cookcountyrecord.com, “Product liability complaint alleges pressure cooker burned woman after lid, contents exploded“, Bethany Krajelis, March 2, 2015