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Gas or electric ranges are found in just about every home here in West Virginia. A kitchen stove is something that is typically used on a daily basis and is necessary to prepare most meals. As a general rule, an electric range can be used without worrying about any serious harm — with some common sense. Unfortunately, when defective household products come into play, it’s a different story. 

Sears has recently issued a recall for roughly 3,000 of its electric ranges. It seems as if the heating element on the stove may not adhere as it should. This creates the dangerous possibility of electrical shock for consumers.

The electric ranges are either black or white and have stainless steel accents. The cooktops on the affected ranges are smooth. The two affected models are 709.90152 and 709.90153 with serial numbers ranging from NF408 to NF424 and NF408 and NF427 respectively. Consumers can find these numbers in the storage drawer.

It appears that this recall comes before any major damage or injury may occur to consumers and their property. However, this is not always the case. In some cases, manufacturers are aware of their faulty products and allow them to be sold to and used by consumers anyway.

A recall for defective household products may only come once someone has been injured. West Virginia residents who have been injured by a defective product may be entitled to take legal action. A products liability lawsuit can be filed against the manufacturer of the product in order to seek financial accountability with regard to monetary losses. An award achieved will hopefully lessen the financial burden suffered as a result of any harm caused. 

Source: CBS Philadelphia, “Sear Recalls Electric Ranges, Possible Shock Hazard“, Jim Donovan, Feb. 25, 2015