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Airbags were designed to help protect drivers and passengers in vehicles when accidents occur. However, when airbags are defective, they not only fail to protect vehicle occupants but may also cause injuries. While some injuries can occur due to airbags failing to deploy, some injuries may occur because airbags deploy for no reason. Unfortunately, airbag failures are common auto defects cited in West Virginia lawsuits, and the trend in airbag-related lawsuits does not seem to be ending.

A woman recently filed a lawsuit against General Motors after the airbags in her vehicle deployed unexpectedly. The vehicle was a 2005 Pontiac Grand GT, which she purchased in early 2012. Two years later, she says that she was driving down the road safely when the airbag system malfunctioned and the airbags deployed unexpectedly.

When the airbags deployed without warning, the woman suffered a serious injury to her wrist, in addition to various other personal damages. She is now suing GM for designing, manufacturing and selling an airbag system that was defective. She says that GM knew the system was defective and failed to inform American consumers of its findings.

Auto defects involving airbags have been a common problem over the past few years all across the country, including in West Virginia. There has been speculation that one of the manufacturers of some of the defective airbags knew of the potential problem and did nothing about it. If this occurred in this woman’s case, and she can prove it with adequate evidence, she may be able to recover due compensation for her injuries and related financial and non-financial burdens.  

Source: louisianarecord.com, “GM sued by New Orleans woman over faulty airbags“, Andrey Burin, March 12, 2015