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Drivers of BMW, Nissan or Fiat vehicles in West Virginia may benefit from learning that several vehicles were recently recalled. The recall is in response to auto defects discovered in tens of thousands of automobiles. Government officials said the manufacturers’ automobiles may unexpectedly stall.

The BMW recall involves more than 18,000 cars and affects certain vehicles from model year 2014. Components were not properly nickel-plated, which officials said could cause the fuel pumps to fail, causing the cars to stall. BMW has offered to replace these pumps for free.

The Nissan Rouge from model year 2014 also has the same problem, thus resulting in the recall of more than 76,000 of these vehicles manufactured from June 2013 to June 2014. Because the pump might fail, it can increase a person’s risk of crashing. Finally, a total of more than 5,600 500e electric cars by Fiat Chrysler have been recalled. The recalled vehicles were manufactured from March 2012 to November 2014. The Fiat’s issue has to do with a software incompatibility problem between the battery-pack control module and electric-vehicle control unit, which can cause the system to shut down and the car to stall.

Auto defects can end up causing severe injuries or deaths if they are not corrected. If a person becomes injured as a result of this type of defect, he or she has the right to file to seek damages through a civil lawsuit, which may help that person to cover financial losses linked to the use of the defective car. People who lose loved ones as a result of auto defects also may choose to file wrongful death claims in West Virginia.

Source: propertycasualty360.com, “Fuel pump issues cause more auto recalls“, Patricia L. Harman, April 15, 2015