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As most West Virginia residents are aware, one of the primary safety threats at home for children are window blind cords. Although manufacturers are expected to design and make household window blinds that are safe for use, the truth of the matter is that mistakes can happen in the design process or down the production line. Unfortunately, defective household products like window blinds can have a negative impact on a young child’s life without that child even realizing that he or she is in harm’s way.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, a voluntary recall of roughly 200,000 window blinds was made recently by Blinds to Go. Apparently, the recall is due to a strangulation risk. This can occur when the cord loop or chain from the window shade slips out of the holding device.

This particular recall affects Smartlift cellular and pleated shades, Serenity Shades, Panel Tracks Shades and custom roller shades equipped with Sidewinders. These were sold exclusively online and at the company’s showrooms. A free repair kit is available from Blinds to Go for consumers who have the effected products.

With new recalls virtually every week, West Virginia residents and parents will likely want to keep an eye out for any mention of defective household products in order to keep themselves and their families safe. When it comes to window blinds, parents may want to consider cutting long cords and loops or opting for other products. Regardless, when an injury occurs from a defective product, individuals may be entitled to compensation via a civil court claim, which may also ensure that the manufacturer assumes responsibility for its actions.

Source: wsbtv.com, “Blinds recalled due to child strangulation risk“, April 2, 2015