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When parents put their babies to bed in the evenings, they naturally trust that their children’s cribs will keep them safe throughout the night. However, West Virginia parents may be alarmed to learn that multiple baby products have recently been recalled due to posing safety hazards, and these defective products includes certain cribs. The cribs, in particular, are known to contain lead.

The company Baby’s Dream has decided to recall thousands of its cribs. According to the company, the cribs’ paint features high amounts of lead. This means that the cribs violate the national standard for lead paint.

The presence of lead in the cribs’ paint is particularly concerning since it is common for toddlers to put things in their mouths. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said that, if ingested, lead has the potential to be harmful to a person’s health. The recent crib recall involves cribs that are full-size, as well as furniture sold under various names, including Heritage, Braxton and Brie. Consumers are encouraged to get in touch with the company to exchange their products.

If defects in products are not caught early enough, they can sometimes cause a consumer to suffer serious injuries. When people are hurt by using defective products, they have the legal right to seek compensation for monetary damages by filing product liability claims in West Virginia. Financial restitution may be helpful for covering medical treatments required in light of the injuries. In order to succeed in such a case, it is mandatory to prove that the product manufacturer’s negligence caused the consumer’s injuries or, at minimum, materially contributed to them.

Source: wpri.com, “Weekly recalls include cribs, baby gates“, Susan Hogan, May 15, 2015