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Some West Virginia residents must use medical devices in order to remain active throughout their lives. Some have to make use of medical devices in order to undergo certain procedures such as a coronary angiography. An angiographic catheter is an important part of this procedure as it works as a conduit for fluids, contrast, etc. Unfortunately, if the catheters used in these procedures are defective medical devices, it can have adverse effects on the patient.

Over 38,000 of these catheters have been recalled by Cook Medical. This is only in the United States. There are nearly 60,000 more that have been recalled worldwide. The recall comes after finding out that the tips of the catheters may separate from the catheter itself or split. When this happens, the device can malfunction and could require assistance from medical professionals.

There have been over two dozen reports of incidents here in the U.S., and at least 14 of them have resulted in serious adverse events. The severity of these incidents are unknown at this time. However, these were serious enough for the FDA to classify this medical device as a Class I recall, which is the most serious of them all.

Victims in West Virginia who have suffered an injury as a result of malfunctioning or defective medical devices are entitled to seek recovery of various expenses incurred as a result. The manufacturer of the device, and possibly any medical professionals involved, can be named as defendants in a lawsuit. If the claim is thoroughly and successfully presented, victims may receive a monetary award for sustained financial losses that are properly documented in the case.

Source: cardiovascularbusiness.com, “Cook Medical recalls 38,000 angiographic catheters“, Tim Casey, Aug. 10, 2015