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Although West Virginia residents hope that they never do, many purchase defective products unknowingly. In some cases, an injury results, which could lead to financial losses. Luckily, consumers are protected by products liability law. When it can be formally documented that dangerous or defective products were the cause of the injury, it may be possible to recover a monetary award.

Safety 1st has recalled roughly 35,000 highchairs after it received various reports of children removing the tray and falling out of the chair. This resulted in a number of child injuries. There were 68 reports of the tray being removed by children and 11 reports of actual injuries. These injuries included cuts, bruises and chipped teeth.

The high chairs were sold at both online and brick-and-mortar Babies R Us and Toys R Us stores, in addition to online sites for Walmart and Amazon. They retailed for roughly $120 and were on sale from May 2013 to May 2015. The high chairs are wooden and black in color with a printed seat pad that is black and white with either a pink or blue border. The plastic tray that can be detached is white.

One of the worst things in life is seeing a child injured, especially when the injuries suffered are the result of dangerous or defective products. West Virginia consumers expect the products they pay for to be in proper working condition and will not cause harm to themselves or their children. When physical or emotional harm is suffered following the use of a defective product, a civil claim may be the best step in formally seeking the recovery of financial damages occasioned by the injuries.

Source: abc7news.com, “Highchairs recalled on reports kids fell off, chipped teeth”, Oct. 8, 2015