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The automaker Hyundai has decided to recall engines in nearly 500,000 Sonata sedans in the United States, including in West Virginia. The recall follows the discovery of auto defects in the sedans. The company said the manufacturing defects may cause the vehicles to unexpectedly stall.

The vehicles being recalled were manufactured between December 2009 and April 2012. They were made at a company assembly plant that was equipped with 2.4-liter and 2-liter gas engines. According to the United States National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, metallic debris has the potential to stay in the vehicle’s crankshaft area, thus restricting the flow of oil.

Administration officials said engine failure would cause the vehicle to stall, thus increasing a motorist’s risk of being involved in a collision. In addition, parts that are worn would generate a cyclic, metallic knocking noise coming from the car engine. Dealers are willing to inspect consumers’ sedans and replace their engines for free. The company is also recalling about 100,000 Accent cars since their brake lights might fail.

Auto defects can, unfortunately, cause injury or death in West Virginia if they are caught too late. In this case, an injured consumer has the right to pursue compensation for damages through a civil court claim. In addition, the loved ones of a person who died due to a defective vehicle may choose to file a wrongful death claim against the car manufacturer. Even though monetary compensation cannot reverse injuries or bring back a deceased loved one, it may help the plaintiffs to more easily move on from such a traumatizing ordeal.

Source: NBC News, “Hyundai Recalls 470,000 U.S. Sonatas to Fix Engine Debris Defect“, Alastair Jamieson and Christopher Nelson, Sept. 26, 2015