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West Virginia residents may be interested in hearing that over 100 women are filing a lawsuit against a birth control manufacturer after they willingly took contraceptive pills thinking that they were being protected from an unwanted pregnancy. Unfortunately, this didn’t turn out to be the case. In fact, it is reported that 94 women gave birth after getting pregnant unexpectedly and 17 others did not carry until the end of the full term, and they claim dangerous or defective products were the reason.

According to documents filed with the court, the pills were taken as directed. However, the women still got pregnant. Apparently, this was due to an error in packaging. The package had been rotated 180 degrees, which reversed the order of the pills. In other words, the placebo pills were taken when active pills should have been ingested.

The women are seeking millions of damages in order to compensate for their lost wages and pain and suffering, as well as child-rearing expenses. According to the FDA, the pharmaceutical company did recall the pills that had been affected by the packaging error. At that time, over three million packs of pills were recalled.

It isn’t unreasonable for individuals in West Virginia and across the United States to expect their prescription medicine to be safe and effective. While this is true most of the time, there are instances when dangerous or defective products make it into the hands of consumers. When this happens, it may be possible to hold the manufacturer responsible for its recklessness by filing a product liability suit and seeking compensation for the injuries and damages sustained as a result of that carelessness.

Source: CNN, “Birth control packaging error leads to lawsuit“, Jen Christensen, Nov. 12, 2015