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Medical devices that are not made properly can end up causing serious medical issues in patients in West Virginia. One medical device was recently recalled after officials found that it can cause infections. The recall of defective medical devices by Custom Ultrasonics was issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The devices, known as automated endoscope reprocessors, are utilized to disinfect and wash endoscopes used in internal examinations. Government authorities issued the recall for Custom Ultrasonics’ reprocessors because of a high risk of the transmission of an infection that is associated with these devices. An estimated 2,800 devices are being used in outpatient clinics and hospitals throughout the United States right now.

The FDA is recommending that every health care facility currently using these devices switch to other techniques for reprocessing endoscopes as quickly as possible. The administration considers the devices to be Class 2, which means they are medium risk. The classification of a device determines how much the federal administration regulates it.

Patients in West Virginia who have been harmed by defective medical devices have the right to file civil lawsuits against the device manufacturers, seeking the reimbursement of monetary damages. A financial award may help to cover the cost of treating a patient who has been negatively impacted by a dangerous device. It may also help to address pain and suffering caused by use of the device. A monetary award may not be able to change the events that have happened, but it may help the patient to experience a sense of justice in light of them.

Source: yorkdispatch.com, “FDA recalls medical device potentially used by York facilities”, David Weissman, Nov. 15, 2015