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Bean bag chairs are very popular gifts for children at Christmas. For West Virginia residents who have purchased a bean bag for their child, grandchild or other child in their lives, it may time to check to see if it is part of a recall. Dangerous or defective products come in a number of forms, and right now, it includes bean bag chairs.

There are more than two million bean bags chairs being recalled by Ace Bayou Company. These chairs were sold between 1995 and 2013. The recalled bean bag chairs have an exterior zipper and an interior zipper. There is no pull tab on the exterior zipper, but it can still be opened by children, who can then access the inner zipper that does actually have a pull tab.

If children open the zippers, they can inhale or ingest the beads, which can lead to a choking hazard or cause them to suffocate. So far, there have been two children who have died from these dangerous bean bag chairs, including a 3-year-old and a 13-year-old. They both inhaled the beans from inside the chair and suffocated.

Consumers are being advised to ensure that there is a metal staple in place to disable the exterior zipper. If one is not present, the company requests that consumers contact them for a free kit to permanently disable the exterior zipper. If a West Virginia child has suffered an injury or has been killed as a result of one of these dangerous or defective products, it may be wise to speak to a legal professional to determine what options are available to recover monetary damages. One option may be a products liability suit against the manufacturer for allowing such an unsafe product on the market.

Source: wncn.com, “2.2 million bean bag chairs recalled, 2 deaths reported“, Craig Anderson, Dec. 18, 2015