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Medical patients in West Virginia take a risk when choosing where and from whom to seek medical care. Doctors and other medical staff are obligated to act according to the highest level of patient safety standards possible. However, defective medical devices sometimes cause injuries to patients no matter how careful and diligent medical staff members may be.

A global supply of Chariot Guiding Sheaths have been named in a recent recall. The scientific corporation issuing the recall has stated that there are 7,000 devices being taken off hospital shelves because they pose dangers to patients. Apparently, pieces of the devices can break off during medical procedures, thus causing a dangerous obstruction to blood flow.

A guiding sheath is a tool that is inserted into a blood vessel so that other tools may then be slid through it to reach the procedure site in the patient’s body. By November 2015, there were reportedly 14 documented incidents in which pieces of the devices broke off during procedures. Some of the breakages occurred on the portions of the devices that were inside the bodies of patients. 

Boston Scientific Corporation, the company that has issued the recall for the defective medical devices, has cautioned doctors and hospitals to immediately stop using the products. West Virginia patients who have been injured or made ill because of medical devices that are defective may seek monetary judgments for damages by filing product liability claims in civil court. When doing so, it is typically advisable to consult with an experienced attorney to obtain legal guidance in the matter.

Source: startribune.com, “Boston Scientific recalls Chariot Guiding Sheaths, citing complications“, Joe Carlson, Dec. 9, 2015