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If doctors in West Virginia fail to diagnose or properly treat patients, they may be held financially responsible in civil court. One woman in another state claimed she was injured at the hands of a surgeon, and she filed a medical malpractice suit. A jury recently awarded the woman $1.52 million in the case involving surgical errors.

The doctor performed a hysterectomy on the woman back in 2011. During the surgery, he caused her to suffer a bowel injury. Surgical experts during the recent trial testified that the doctor’s failure to locate the cuts he had made and quickly fix them caused an infection to develop in the woman’s abdomen. The infection got worse over a period of 10 days.

The woman ended up requiring extra surgery to clean out her infection; however, the woman’s intestines had suffered so much damage at this point that she also required a colostomy. As a result of her bowel injury, the woman additionally had to wear a bag designed to collect her waste for a total of seven months, and she had to go through additional surgeries involving her abdomen. A jury of six people unanimously found that the doctor’s failure to both recognize and repair the woman’s bowel injury caused the woman both lost wages and pain and suffering.

When surgical errors in West Virginia lead to life-altering injuries, the patient who was harmed has the right to file a lawsuit against the reportedly at-fault doctor. Compensatory damages may be awarded based upon a showing of negligence. Competent proof of negligence is necessary to establish liability to the court’s satisfaction, at which point claims for damages will be adjudicated.

Source: timesunion.com, “Delanson woman wins $1.52M malpractice jury award“, Claire Hughes, March 3, 2016