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People with spinal cord injuries in West Virginia may have limitations in their movement and thus rely heavily on their loved ones to perform daily functions. However, one neurological surgery professor has been spending three decades developing a technique for repairing a spinal cord injury. He has focused mostly on omentum, which is a skinny sheet of connective tissue, fat and blood vessels that is located on the intestines and abdomen.

According to research studies, omentum features several restorative properties. For example, omentum has the potential to repair vascular damage. It can also provide necessary blood to the brain, heart and spinal cord.

The professor wondered if the omentum had the potential to help with healing a spinal cord that had been injured. Thus, he completed experiments in the 1980s that showed that when the omentum was placed on a spinal cord of an animal soon after it was injured, it was possible to prevent the development of scar tissue in the area, which was considered to be possibly extremely important for patients’ recoveries. A surgery involving the omentum was done on a woman with a spinal cord injury as well, with successful results. These results were recently presented at an international symposium.

The spinal cord research that continues to be conducted may give hope to people who suffer from these potentially life-altering injuries. Unfortunately, these injuries can be physically, emotionally and financially difficult to cope with. People in West Virginia who have suffered spinal cord injury as a result of the negligence of other parties have the right to file personal injury claims against these other parties, pursing the reimbursement of monetary damages sustained.  

Source: generalsurgerynews.com, “Surgeon Repairs Spinal Cord With Omentum, Helps Paralyzed Woman Walk“, Victoria Stern, May 9, 2016