COVID-19 NOTIFICATION: To protect your safety in response to the threat of COVID-19, our staff is still available to serve you during our normal office hours. We are offering our clients and potential clients the option to connect with us via telephone, email and video-conferencing. Please call or email us to discuss your options.

An individual in another state recently claimed that a misplaced catheter caused him or her serious injury. As a result, the patient has decided to file a medical malpractice claim against the medical providers allegedly responsible for the injury. When errors such as surgical errors or other medical mistakes occur due to a care provider’s carelessness in West Virginia, this provider may be held financially responsible in civil court.

According to the recent lawsuit, the medical providers did not utilize equipment appropriately to assess and complete the proper placement of the patient’s catheter. The providers are also accused of not detecting and diagnosing the incorrect catheter placement. They allegedly did not meet the established standards of care.

The reported omissions and negligent acts caused the patient to suffer serious and permanent injuries. These include internal and vascular injuries leading to pain and suffering. The patient also claimed that the ordeal caused him or her mental anguish as well as additional medical expenses.

As part of the lawsuit, the patient is seeking a jury trial as well as a judgment surpassing $50,000, along with lawsuit costs. Doctors and their staff are expected to provide a reasonable degree of care when treating patients. If they fail to do this and surgical errors or other types of debilitating errors happen, the impacted patients have the right to file medical malpractice claims, seeking damages. A damage award in a victoriously fought case in West Virginia may help to cover health care costs and other losses tied to the documented malpractice incident.

Source: madisonrecord.com, “Medical malpractice suit alleges misplaced catheter“, Michael Abella, Nov. 17, 2016