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Consumers in West Virginia might be impacted by a recent recall of food processor blades. The Consumer Product Safety Commission and the small kitchen appliance manufacturer Cuisinart recalled eight million of these dangerous products in the United States after consumers reported that they had found pieces of the blades broken in the food they had processed. Conair, which makes the food processors, received a total of 69 consumer reports.

Thirty of the 69 reports that Conair received apparently involved tooth injuries or mouth lacerations as a result of the broken blades. Officials are urging consumers who have the problematic food processors to take action immediately, especially since a lot of cooking usually takes place around the holiday season. The stainless steel blades being recalled feature four rivets, have a center hub that is plastic and beige in color.

The recall impacts 22 models that were made in China. The models in question were sold from July 1996 to December 2015. They cost anywhere from $100 to $350 at the times they were purchased. Consumers who have the defective blades can get in touch with Cuisinart to get complementary replacement blades.

Companies are expected to manufacture safe products for the public to use, but this does not always happen. If people in the state of West Virginia use dangerous products and end up getting injured as a result, it is within their rights to file product liability claims, seeking the reimbursement of monetary damages sustained. If liability is established to the civil court’s satisfaction, claims for financial losses will be decided.

Source: 10news.com, “Product Recall: Cuisinart food processors recalled by Conair due to laceration hazard“, Dec. 13, 2016