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Following injury to the spinal cord, secondary nerve damage can occur due to internal scarring and inflammation. Unfortunately, this prevents the nervous system from being able to repair itself. However, according to a new study, a nanoparticle that is injected following spinal cord injury may be able to prevent the problematic scarring and inflammation, which may provide hope to spinal cord injury patients in West Virginia and elsewhere.

In the study, mice whose spinal cords were injured improved in their walking ability after getting the nanoparticle injection. In fact, they could walk better than the mice that did not receive the injection. The treatment could possibly minimize secondary spinal cord damage if administered some hours following the injury-causing incident.

The injection could take place in an ambulance with the help of paramedics. It could also be given in an emergency room setting. A doctor warned that the injection is not actually a cure. The original damage is still there, but the secondary damage can be prevented. Future studies are needed to confirm the injected nanoparticle’s safety, but so far, there have been no signs of toxicity.

Sometimes spinal cord injury in West Virginia happens due to the negligence of another party. For instance, perhaps a driver was texting while behind the wheel and caused a serious accident leading to someone else’s spinal cord injury. In this situation, the injured party has the right to file a personal injury claim, seeking the reimbursement of damages sustained. A financial damage award may be helpful for covering medical bills and other costs related to the injury.

Source: northwestern.edu, “Nanoparticles limit damage in spinal cord injury“, Marla Paul, Sept. 5, 2017