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Brain injuries can easily occur as a result of a car accident or a slip-and-fall accident resulting from another party’s negligence in West Virginia. Unfortunately, these types of injuries can have a negative impact on one’s life by leading to speech or cognitive issues, for example. Fortunately, university researchers recently developed a substance called Brain Glue that could one day help with treating traumatic brain injury.

Brain Glue has the consistency of gelatin and can easily take the particular shape of any void that a serious trauma leaves behind in the brain. In essence, the glue provides a healing environment for transplanted stem cells being used to repair damaged tissue. Then, the cells can appropriately regenerate and colonize.

Brain Glue is different from other hydrogels that are synthetic in that it offers many possibilities for trapping neural stem cells. It is also known to reduce the chance of rejection as well as improve integration. This substance is drawing attention because more than 150 individuals pass away each day in the United States from traumatic brain injuries and other types of injuries.

Traumatic brain injury can cause impaired sensation, movement, memory and thinking. It can also result in emotional and personality changes. Those who suffer from this type of injury due to the negligence of another person have the right to file personal injury claims, seeking the reimbursement of monetary damages. A preponderance of the evidence is necessary to establish liability before the court hearing the case. Only then can monetary damage claims be adjudicated in West Virginia.

Source: uga.edu, “‘Brain Glue’ repairs traumatic brain injuries“, Charlene Betourney, Dec. 19, 2017