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One of the most frightening things a patient with a pacemaker could hear is that something is wrong with his or her machine. Unfortunately, a heart device and other medical devices can encounter problems that can have adverse effects on a patient in West Virginia. In these situations, the patient may be willing to work with his or her doctor to determine the best course of action to take immediately.

The Food and Drug Administration is responsible for approving pacemakers and other heart-related devices before they enter the market. However, problems can still arise with these types of devices. A physician must notify a patient if a potential problem has been found with a particular heart device. However, sometimes the patient might hear about the issue directly from a media report or the device manufacturer.

In either case, the doctor will develop a particular plan for resolving the matter given the patient’s unique needs. For example, the doctor might recommend that the patient come into the office so that the doctor can adjust the advice using a special software program. In more extreme cases, a problematic heart device has to be removed and replaced.

Unfortunately, sometimes issues with a heart device or other medical device are not caught early enough, thus causing patients in West Virginia to suffer harm. In these situations, the harmed patients may have the right to file a product liability claim, seeking the reimbursement of monetary damages. A successfully litigated claim may result in a monetary judgment that might help the patient to cover his or her medical costs or other losses associated with the use of the defective device.

Source: clevelandclinic.org, “Heart Device and Pacemaker Recalls: What You Need to Know“, March 30, 2018