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Consumers in West Virginia who have young children may be impacted by a recent recall of cardigan sweater sets, one of multiple products recently recalled. Certain cardigans made by Carter’s are considered dangerous products due to their potential to cause young children to choke. More than 107,000 of these clothing items are affected by the recall.

The specified cardigan sets each contain a penguin bodysuit, pants and a gray cardigan featuring a hood. These sets were created for newborns and kids up to the age of 24 months. They were marketed at Carter’s stores, online and at other retailers throughout the United States.

So far, the company has gotten three reports about children placing detached toggle buttons in their mouths. However, they have no received any reports of injuries. Any consumer who has purchased the cardigan set is encouraged to stop using it and return it as soon as possible for a refund.

Manufacturers are expected to produce safe products for their customers, but unfortunately, this does not always happen. Dangerous products sometimes end up in consumers’ homes and cause serious injuries due to their defects. In this situation, an injured consumer (likely a child’s parent or guardian) has the right to file a personal injury claim against the reportedly at-fault manufacturer, seeking the reimbursement of damages. An understanding of what facts must be proved will likely be needed to prevail in such a case in West Virginia. A claim that is successfully presented may lead to a financial award that might help with addressing medical costs and other losses associated with the use of a defective product.

Source: ctpost.com, “Recall watch: Tortilla chips, cardigans among pulled products“, Amanda Cuda, May 8, 2018