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When people study or talk about those who have suffered injuries to the brain, they often think about male soldiers or players in the National Football League. Unfortunately, women have not been well represented in research on traumatic brain injury. However, the VA’s brain bank is trying to change this — a move that may have a positive impact on female brain injury victims in West Virginia and other parts of the United States.

The brain bank is working on conducting more research on female brains through a partnership with a nonprofit organization called PINK Concussions. This organization focuses on brain injuries such a concussions that occur as a result of military service, accidents, domestic violence and sports. Research on brain injuries in women and men is critical considering that brain injuries can lead to PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

CTE is essentially a degenerative disease that affects the brain in individuals who have experienced repeated brain trauma. So far, scientists have not found any proven CTE cases in females due to the lack of research on the female brain. However, the most remarkable brain study revealed more than 100 CTE cases involving professional football players as well as 66 in the brains of male veterans.

Traumatic brain injury can understandably be frustrating to deal with for both men and women in West Virginia — especially if the injury was the result of another person’s carelessness. In this situation, the victim may choose to file a personal injury claim against the negligent individual, seeking the reimbursement of monetary damages. A successfully fought claim may lead to a monetary award that might help with covering ongoing medical expenses and other brain injury-related losses.

Source: wfmynews2.com, “Making a difference for female brain injury research“, Megan Shinn, April 29, 2018