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Consumers in West Virginia who use sinus nasal sprays may be affected by a current product recall. CVS Health recently reported that it has recalled its 12-hour nasal mists for sinus relief because these are dangerous home products. The problem has to do with microbiological contamination.

According to officials, the nasal mists being recalled were discovered to have been contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This gram-negative pathogen may result in colonization as well as subsequent infection in those who use the nasal mists repeatedly. Unfortunately, this is potentially life threatening in particular patient populations — for example, in patients who are immunocompromised or suffer from cystic fibrosis.

The problematic product comes in a bottle that is half an ounce in size. Customers have been instructed to quit using the nasal spray and take it back to the place where they purchased it. The recent recall of the nasal mist products is voluntary.

Customers understandably expect that anything found on store shelves is safe for public consumption, but unfortunately, this is not always the case. Sometimes, customers become seriously injured or ill as a result of using dangerous home products. In these situations, they have the right to file product liability claims against the makers of the hazardous products, seeking damages. An understanding of what facts need to be proved in product liability cases will likely be necessary to prevail in this type of case in West Virginia. No amount of monetary damages can undo the events leading to a customer’s injuries or illness stemming from a dangerous product, but damages may help the customer to more easily move forward from the ordeal.