Distracted driving happens in hundreds of different ways. Some drivers text as they drive. Others eat a meal or drink a cup of coffee. Still others talk to their friends or make phone calls. Others use the GPS or try to find a radio station. The list goes on and on.

In light of this, it is important to remember that there are really just three different types of distracted driving, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are:

  • Manual distractions: When a driver physically removes one or two hands from the steering wheel.
  • Cognitive distractions: When a driver stops thinking about driving and begins to think about anything else.
  • Visual distractions: When a driver looks away from the road and at anything else, either inside the car or outside of the vehicle.

You have probably seen all of these drivers. The person looking down to change the radio station is visually distracted. The person daydreaming about their weekend plans is cognitively distracted. The person reaching for their phone where it fell on the floor is manually distracted.

Plus, things like distracted driving really increase risks because they do all of these things at once. When drivers face three types of distraction, they have almost nothing left for actually driving their car — even at 70 miles per hour.

That’s when accidents happen. That’s when people wind up in the hospital. If you find yourself injured and facing some serious medical bills due to someone else’s mistakes, you need to know how to seek compensation.