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Defective Household Products Archives

Talcum Powder's Odyssey: From Acceptance to Suspicion

Johnson & Johnson's talcum powder journey dates back more than a century to 1894 when it was introduced to the market after receiving an overwhelming response from mothers following childbirth. The credit for inventing this product goes to Dr. Frederick B. Kilmer, the first director of scientific affairs of Johnson & Johnson. In 1893, Dr. Kilmer had first suggested the talc for skin irritation caused by medicated plasters. Later, it became popular amongst mothers post-delivery who demanded more of it and the rest, as they say, is history.

Roundup Litigation Expected To Begin Soon

Roundup, the most popular herbicide in the world, manufactured by Monsanto, has constantly been in the news regarding its safety ever since research studies linked it to cancer. The latest development propelled by Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has resulted in the addition of Glyphosate, a key ingredient of Roundup, to California's list of chemicals that can cause cancer, effective July 7, 2017. OEHHA made this move as per a California law: Proposition 65, which requires all carcinogenic chemicals to be listed; this law further requires warnings highlighting the fact that significant exposure to these chemicals can cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm.

Office chairs recalled as defective household products

When a business is equipping its office, it is not uncommon to head to Office Depot for desks, chairs and other office supplies. The same is true for West Virginia homeowners, especially those who work from home. When doing this, one of the last things most individuals consider is whether the products they are purchasing are on recall lists.  Most consumers believe that companies would not manufacture or sell defective household products. Unfortunately, though, they do, and this appears to be the case with some Office Depot executive chairs.

Defective household products are sometimes table saws

West Virginia residents don't expect that purchased products will pose a hazard to them if they use the product as instructed. However, if a product is not designed or manufactured properly, it could result in a defect that could potentially cause injury to a consumer. Defective household products come in many shapes and forms. In this particular case, it is a power tool just like those that many homeowners across the country own and use regularly.

Some West Virginia homes may contain defective household products

West Virginia consumers are likely to have any number of tools and appliances in their homes. From kitchen equipment to lawn mowers and other power tools, daily life often involves using purchased products to complete chores and home-maintenance projects. Unfortunately, some homeowners have been severely injured or made ill because of defective household products. Many have suffered injuries while using common everyday items.

DrillMaster drills latest of defective household products

West Virginia residents who are purchasing tools for their loved ones as Christmas gifts may want to double-check and ensure that they are not purchasing a faulty product. Some defective household products, such as tools, have recently come to light. One of these is a cordless drill from Harbor Freight.

Home Depot may get sued for selling defective household products

Although products that are defective should never reach the homes of innocent consumers here in West Virginia, the fact of the matter is that they do. This is one reason why recalls are in place and should be announced immediately after a defect or risk has become apparent. However, what happens when a recall is not made and defective household products are purchased by and used by consumers who have no idea that they are at risk of an injury?

SharkNinja blenders are the latest defective household products

When West Virginia residents purchase a product from the store, the last thing that they probably think about is whether or not the product is safe to use. Most people assume that because a product is on store shelves that it is not unsafe and does not pose a risk. Sadly, this is not always the case. While companies do recall defective household products, the recall may come after it is too late and the injury has occurred.

Duraflame heater center of defective household products suit

In the winter, it is inevitable that West Virginia residents and other homeowners will use heaters within their homes, including space heaters. Sadly, space heaters, when used improperly, can result in fires. However, at the same time, a defective heater could cause a fire and result in a complete loss of everything that one owns. A woman from another state is alleging that a company sold defective household products and that she became a victim of one of them.

Fire alarms are the latest defective household products

One of the most common items in all West Virginia homes is the fire alarm. These are recommended to be in various rooms, as close to the ceiling as possible, and on each level of the home. Fire alarms are designed to protect members of the household when a fire breaks out, as it sounds an alarm as soon as it detects smoke. Unfortunately, when fire alarms do not sound alerts when there is a fire because they are defective household products, it can lead to a potentially dangerous situation for everyone involved.  

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